5,000 more jobs to be created in sea transport sector

SINGAPORE– Over the next decade, more than 5,000 extra jobs and S$ 4.5 billion in value-add will be produced in the sea transportation sector under its industry change map (ITM) launched on Friday (Jan 12).

The plan sets out the restructuring plans for the shipping, port, maritime services sections of the maritime sector, which contributes 7 per cent of Singapore’s gross domestic product and utilizes over 170,000 people.

Revealed by Senior Citizen Minister of State (Transport and Health) Lam Pin Min at an industry occasion, the ITM was established by the Maritime and Port of Authority of Singapore (MPA) in collaboration with the industry, unions and other government companies. A typical style amongst the ITMs for the various sectors, digitalisation will also be key in driving the sector’s improvement. While doing so, some existing jobs will be reskilled and redesigned into roles that tap on digital skills.

Port workers will discover to operate in a more automated environment with the new port coming up in Tuas. Seafarers will also run clever vessels remotely in the future, while port crane operators who presently operate a single crane at any one time, will have the ability to supervise approximately five cranes while seated in an operations centre.

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At a media instruction earlier in the week, MPA chief executive Andrew Tan stated there will be many opportunities for a whole spectrum of roles including marine property surveyors, delivering operations officers, ship representatives, shipbrokers, charterers, port operations officers.

Mr Tan worried that the restructuring does not require displacement of employees. “We will make sure that those that are currently doing those jobs will be retrained and reskilled to play the brand-new roles,” he stated.

He noted that the existing workforce in the sea transportation sector are specialists, executives, supervisors and service technicians (PMETs) who remain in a “great position to reskill themselves” by learning new skills such as information analytics and systems engineering.

More data experts will be required as maritime business tap data analytics to keep track of fleet-wide performance. New roles would likewise need individuals who are skilled in systems crafting to develop and manage complex integrated systems, in order to synchronise unmanned and manned activities in the Tuas mega port.

Announced in 2012, the new port will combine all of Singapore’s port operations in a single location. It will open in 4 stages, with the very first berths anticipated to be operational in 2021.

Apart from re-training the rank and file, Mr Tan worried the value of grooming the next generation of maritime industry leaders. “Among the feedback we get when we engage the industry is that our locals do not have that worldwide mindset. We desire to promote higher international mindsets by giving more exposure opportunities to those in leadership positions,” he said.

The digitalisation drive will offer the Republic a strategic competitive advantage in the international maritime market, amid growing competitors from nations such as China which are developing their facilities.

” It is important that among other maritime clusters, the Singapore maritime cluster is the first to continue in this area,” stated Mr Tan.

Mr Tan reiterated that digitalisation will bring immediate advantages to the market– higher effectiveness and savings in time and expenses through the streamlining of processes.

Amongst other initiatives, Singapore is investing in brand-new port abilities such as a fleet of 30 automated directed automobiles (AGVs) which have actually been deployed in a trial, along with automated lawn cranes and quay cranes in the Pasir Panjang Terminal. They are used to carry large containers within the port.

Along with the launch of the ITM, several memorandums of understanding (MOU) were signed between MPA and tripartite partners on Friday.

For instance, an MOU signed in between Singapore Customs, Singapore Shipping Association (SSA) and MPA will cover the digitalisation of trade and maritime files such as a bill of lading– a document released by a carrier to acknowledge invoice of freight for delivery. The effort might involve making use of blockchain technology, said Mr Tan.

The implementation of the sea transportation ITM will need numerous stakeholders to interact, and the MOU finalizings are a demonstration of their dedication, he kept in mind.

MOUs to boost maritime start-up community

To encourage innovation and explore new development areas, the Maritime Technology Acceleration Programme (MTAP) will be launched, following the finalizing of a memorandum of understanding on Friday (Jan 12) by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) Business.

The three-year collaboration will include a residency collaboration at Block 71 at the JTC Launchpad @ One North. The two organisations will jointly organise activities to foster the maritime startup environment here such as running the Smart Port Obstacle (SPC), and building awareness amongst the startup neighborhood on opportunities in the maritime and port market.

The SPC is a yearly competitors for worldwide start-ups to tackle challenges in the shipping, port and maritime logistics clusters.

MPA and NUS Enterprise will likewise shortlist start-ups from the SPC to establish their prototypes through a 10-week curriculum that consist of training and mentorship. At the end of the effort, the start-ups will pitch their options to a judging panel, and successful start-ups will be offered grants to carry out proof-of-concept or product development projects with industry partners.

MPA chief executive Andrew Tan noted that the start-up community in the maritime industry is at a nascent phase. “The level of awareness (of) chances in the maritime sector (for start-ups) is not extremely high.

Separately, an MOU was tattooed by start-up Glee Tree, MPA and the Singapore Shipping Association for the development of a robotic process automation innovation in the ship firm sector.

The technology serves to automate manual processes such as information extraction, entry and validation. Glee Tree wased established by Mr Christopher Lim, 39 and Ms Ada Lim, 38 about 18 months earlier.

Speaking to TODAY, Marine Nexus CEO Eric Chean, 27, who has been running his maritime start-up for the past two years, stated the maritime start-up environment in Singapore is “very small”, compared to the size of the market.

” This is an old market that has an extremely standard technique to doing things. The industry also does not believe in innovation as much compared with other markets,” said Mr Chean.

Acknowledging the Government’s efforts to stimulate innovation in the sector, he included: “( It) can refrain from doing everything. The economic sector must likewise step-up.”

Revealed by Senior Citizen Minister of State (Transport and Health) Lam Pin Min at a market occasion, the ITM was developed by the Maritime and Port of Authority of Singapore (MPA) in partnership with the industry, unions and other government agencies. Apart from re-training the rank and file, Mr Tan stressed the significance of grooming the next generation of maritime industry leaders. Amongst other efforts, Singapore is investing in brand-new port capabilities such as a fleet of 30 automated assisted automobiles (AGVs) which have been released in a trial, along with automated yard cranes and quay cranes in the Pasir Panjang Terminal. MPA chief executive Andrew Tan kept in mind that the startup community in the maritime market is at a nascent stage. “The level of awareness (of) chances in the maritime sector (for startups) is not really high.